Tuesday, 28 August 2012

The African Small Cats; Beautiful dangerous African Serval


The African serval is a small, slender cat with long legs, a lean body, and a small head. Its extra-long neck gives it the nickname "giraffe cat." The cat's coat is brown with black lines and spots while its belly is a soft white. Native to the grasslands of Africa, the serval's colors allow it to seemingly disappear in the thick grass. Unlike many other cat species, this small feline loves to climb, leap, and play in water. It vocalizes using shrill cries and mews, but the serval can growl and purr, too. Servals are crepuscular to avoid the heat of the day, although they also hunt at night when needed. The cats often share their savanna habitat with caracals and may compete with them for prey.




Wait and see is the serval's main hunting strategy.  It waits in the tall grass, using its huge ears to listen for approaching prey before pouncing on its meal. Instead of running down a target like a cheetah would, the serval takes a giant leap up into the air and then forces its body weight down upon the victim, trapping it beneath the front paws until the cat can deliver a deadly bite to the neck. This method is efficient and quick.





The serval has a varied diet, eating birds, reptiles, frogs, and large insects.  Standing on its hind legs, a serval can jump more than 9 feet (2.7 meters) straight up to grab birds right out of the air! But small rodents are its most frequent prey item, and servals don't hesitate to reach a long leg down into a rodent's burrow to snatch a meal out of the tunnel! With its many hunting styles, varied diet, and fantastic hearing, the serval is well equipped to be the most successful predator of all the cats.





Servals do not have a specific breeding season, and even though a male's home range may overlap those of several females, they live separately most of the year.  Males may sometimes rest together during the day in small groups, but otherwise they are solitary.





The female serval raises her kittens alone, usually three kittens to a litter. They live in a den made of tall, thick grass, and the mother leaves her kittens most of the day while she hunts for food, returning to stay with them at night.  She accepts the presence of her female kittens longer than that of male kittens: once the boys can hunt for themselves they are no longer welcome at home.  Daughters usually stay with their mother until they are about two years old. In the wild, female servals in overlapping ranges are often related to one another.




Staying wild

Some people think it would be fun to own a wild or exotic cat. This has led to a serval cross-breed cat called the "savanna cat": a captive-raised serval bred with a domestic cat.  Wild animals, even those born in zoos, keep their wild instincts for hundreds, even thousands, of years. It took thousands of years to domesticate "tame" dogs, cats, sheep, and cattle by selective breeding for certain traits. Special permits are required for trained experts or zoos to own or house wild servals, and it is against the law in some states to own savanna cats.







Servals in the wild are not considered endangered except for one subspecies, the North African serval Leptailurus serval constantinus. However, like all wild animals, serval populations can be harmed by habitat loss, global climate change, and hunting for their beautiful fur. It takes the skins of many servals to produce one coat. Fortunately, in many parts of the world the wearing of animal-skin coats for fashion is no longer popular.




Servals are important to their human neighbors because they catch rodents, which carry diseases and contaminate food supplies. With fewer than 300 servals in zoos around the world and less than 150 in United States zoos, getting to know this beautiful feline is a special treat for any animal lover!







Facts about Serval

• The serval has the longest legs and largest ears for its body size of any cat.

• Ancient Egyptians worshipped the serval for its power and grace.

• Servals are perhaps the best hunters in the cat world. While other wild cats are successful in just one of every five or six attempts to kill prey, servals make a kill in about half of all tries.

• The name serval comes from a Portuguese word meaning "wolf deer."

• Other nicknames for the serval are "bush cat" and "giraffe cat

The beautiful and most dangerous African Buffaloes



The African Buffaloes in other words are  also called Affalo or Cape Buffaloes. In many parts of the African Savannah the African Buffaloes,are mostly found in many parts of the African forests, the beautiful African woodlands and and the vast African Savannah which is rich with its great flora and fauna of Africa. These beautiful dangerous African buffaloes are mostly located near the swamps which are flooded with the dangerous Nile crocodiles and, many  floodplains with Africa's most dangerous big five greatest dangerous animals of the world with many of the dangerous venomous snakes living along the grasslands of Africa. All African Buffaloes like to live in their natural habitat just as many herbivorous that  prefer ta dense cover of reeds and fresh grass to fill their big appetite. African Buffaloes depend on large quantities of water and hence, stay close to the perennial sources of the same.

They can be described as large cow-like animals, whose body is covered with sparse covering of dark brown hair. Their body features consist of a large head, thick neck, a broad chest and strong legs. These buffaloes have large droopy ears and low curved horns. In case of males, the horns are joined by a boss, which is a shield that covers their entire forehead. Read on to know some more interesting facts and amazing information on the African buffaloes.

African Buffalo Facts




Binomial Name: Syncerus caffer
Swahili Name: Nyati
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Subphylum: Vertebrata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Bovidae
Subfamily: Bovinae
Genus: Syncerus
Species: S.caffer
Height: About 1.0-1.7 m (3.3-5.6 ft.), at shoulder
Length: About 2.1-3.4 m (7-11ft.)
Weight: Approximately 425-900 kg (935-2000 lb)
Life Span: 15-25 years
Diet: Herbivorous (feeds on tall and coarse grasses)
Range: Eastern and Southern Africa.
Habitat: Open savannas and grasslands, near a permanent source of water
Age of Sexual Maturity: 3.5 to 5.0 years
Gestation Period: 11.5 months (approximately)
Number of Offspring: One

Interesting & Amazing Information About African Buffalo

African buffaloes live in groups of large numbers, which often go as high as 2000 members. Members of the same subgroup stay together and sleep by resting their heads on one another.

The horns of an African buffalo are wonderful indicators of its age and gender. A large adult male has a hard shielding, which protects the base of its skull. This is absent in case of females and young male buffaloes.
These buffaloes always stay at close proximity of a water source. Particularly in the dry season, when they feed on the dried grasses, they take care to stay close to water.
Though African buffaloes share a number of similarities with the Asian water buffaloes, they belong to an entirely different species.
Like Zebras, these buffaloes feed on tall, coarse grasses. While eating, they make use of their tongue and wide incisor row, to feed on the grass quickly.
African buffaloes are highly dangerous and are more likely to attack when injured or cornered.
These buffaloes are well-equipped with self defense mechanisms. Other than humans, they have very few predators, like lion, leopard and spotted hyena. However, even the mighty lions need to group up, to bring down a single buffalo.
African buffaloes fight together against a common predator. They always stay together in a herd, making it difficult for the predator to choose one member out of the group.

These buffaloes mate strictly during the rainy season. Their reproductive period starts from the age of five years.
New born calves remain hidden in vegetation for the first few weeks, before joining the main herd. During this time, their mothers nurse them.
The bond between the mother and child continues for a year or two. The male calves usually leave their mother when they are two years old and join the bachelor group.
African buffaloes have lots of hair on their body. The adult buffaloes lose hair as they age.
Diseases like bovine tuberculosis are a great threat to the African buffaloes. However, the national parks of Africa are taking precautionary measures to protect these buffaloes from this disease.

Weight: Approximately 425-900 kg (935-2000 lb)
Life Span: 15-25 years
Diet: Herbivorous (feeds on tall and coarse grasses)
Range: Eastern and Southern Africa.
Habitat: Open savannas and grasslands, near a permanent source of water
Age of Sexual Maturity: 3.5 to 5.0 years
Gestation Period: 11.5 months (approximately)
Number of Offspring: One
Interesting & Amazing Information About African Buffalo
African buffaloes live in groups of large numbers, which often go as high as 2000 members. Members of the same subgroup stay together and sleep by resting their heads on one another.
The horns of an African buffalo are wonderful indicators of its age and gender. A large adult male has a hard shielding, which protects the base of its skull. This is absent in case of females and young male buffaloes.
These buffaloes always stay at close proximity of a water source. Particularly in the dry season, when they feed on the dried grasses, they take care to stay close to water.
Though African buffaloes share a number of similarities with the Asian water buffaloes, they belong to an entirely different species.
Like Zebras, these buffaloes feed on tall, coarse grasses. While eating, they make use of their tongue and wide incisor row, to feed on the grass quickly.
African buffaloes are highly dangerous and are more likely to attack when injured or cornered.
These buffaloes are well-equipped with self defense mechanisms. Other than humans, they have very few predators, like lion, leopard and spotted hyena. However, even the mighty lions need to group up, to bring down a single buffalo.
African buffaloes fight together against a common predator. They always stay together in a herd, making it difficult for the predator to choose one member out of the group.
These buffaloes mate strictly during the rainy season. Their reproductive period starts from the age of five years.
New born calves remain hidden in vegetation for the first few weeks, before joining the main herd. During this time, their mothers nurse them.
The bond between the mother and child continues for a year or two. The male calves usually leave their mother when they are two years old and join the bachelor group.
African buffaloes have lots of hair on their body. The adult buffaloes lose hair as they age.
Diseases like bovine tuberculosis are a great threat to the African buffaloes. However, the national parks of Africa are taking precautionary measures to protect these buffaloes from this disease.

The Amazing African Rain forest Mountain Gorillas


The giant apes the mountain gorilla
Gorillas are some of the most dangerous animals ever if you ever see them in the heart of Africa and in their natural habitat at the vicinity of the Ruwenzori mountains. These powerful gorillas live to their names as many of the famous gorillas ever known have always been able to fascinate many tourist who have been able to see the gorillas in their natural habitat and many gorillas have also been on the forefront in pleasing the onlookers in many of the world zoos.


Gorillas are the largest of all primates—the group of animals that includes monkeys, lemurs, orangutans, chimpanzees, and humans. Sharing the same natural habitat with the gorillas there are no animals as peaceful as gorillas. In the wilderness the gorillas are always family-oriented and a lot of time is pent in the family of different sizes of gorillas day in day out.

With many of the human features almost resembling to gorillas, people tend to compare gorillas with humans, but there are several differences which make people from gorilla. As you can see, the gorillas are still in the wilderness still eating their leaves , fruits and nuts and once in a while some flesh or meat from the jungle while you are out there reading about gorillas. Although gorillas  are able to stand straight all the time gorillas will always like to walk using their hands as well as their legs. As powerful and as built as they are, the gorilla arms are much longer than their legs just as the dangerous grizzly bears out there in the wilderness. since gorillas are also good tree climbers while on the ground, gorillas use the backs of their fingers like extra feet when they walk. This is called the knuckle walk.





Troop leader
A group of gorillas living together is called a “troop.” There can be 5 to 30 gorillas in one troop, led by a strong, experienced male known as a "silverback." His job is a big one. He is responsible for the safety and well being of the members of his troop. The silverback makes all the decisions, such as where the troop will travel for food each day, when they will stop to eat or rest, and where they will spend the night.

Gorillas are generally peaceful creatures, but sometimes a younger male from another troop will challenge the silverback. To scare unwanted gorillas away, he will beat his chest with cupped hands to make a loud noise, scream, bare his teeth, then charge forward. Sometimes he will break off branches and shake them at the intruder.


Breakfast in bed
Can you imagine waking up each morning surrounded by food? Almost everything a gorilla eats is plant material, so life in the forest is like living in a huge restaurant! Gorilla food includes leaves, stems, fruits, seeds, and roots. And gorillas love to eat—it’s their favorite activity! An adult male will eat up to 40 pounds (18 kilograms) of food each day. Gorillas’ large stomachs can hold the bulky food they eat. Strong jaws help them chew tough stems. At the San Diego Zoo and the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, the gorillas get a variety of seasonal fruits and vegetables, plus banana and ficus leaves.

A gorilla troop doesn’t stay in the same place for more than a day. After all, they don’t want to deplete their food source! Each morning the silverback will lead his troop to a new area where food is plentiful. After a morning of munching, each adult gorilla gathers leaves, twigs, and branches to make a day nest for resting while the youngsters play. After their nap, the gorillas will eat again until bedtime, when they make yet another nest, either on the ground or in a tree, for a good night’s sleep. Gorillas never use the same nest twice.




Baby business
A female gorilla is ready to have babies of her own when she is about eight years old. But first, she must leave the safety of her own troop and find another troop or a lone silverback to live with. A newborn grows quickly. At five to six months old it learns to walk, and by 18 months of age it can follow mom on foot for short distances. Still, the safest place for the younster is its mother's back as she travels thru the dense vegetation of their forest home.

Young gorillas learn by imitating what the others in the troop are doing, and by play fighting with other youngsters. Even the stern silverbacks are gentle with the little ones as they practice new skills. A young gorilla stays close to its mom, sharing her nest, until it is four to six years old. Gorillas have been known to nurse for up to three years.


Gorillas in crisis
Gorillas have no natural enemies or predators, yet these peaceful creatures are very endangered because of humans. People hunt gorillas for food called bushmeat. Logging companies destroy gorilla habitat. Africa may seem far away, but there is something you can do to help! When you buy wood or furniture, ask if the wood has been certified. This means the wood was taken in a way approved by forestry experts. Buying certified wood will encourage logging companies in Africa to follow wildlife laws that will help protect gorillas and other African animals.



Facts about Gorillas
• A baby gorilla can cling to the long hairs on its mom for a ride, leaving the mother’s hands free for walking.
• Gorillas are very hairy, except for their faces, palms, and soles of their feet.
• The adult males, or silverbacks, are almost twice the size of the adult females.
• No two gorilla noses are alike! Researchers in the wild take close-up photos of each gorilla’s face to help identify individuals.
• The San Diego Zoo's first two gorillas arrived in 1931. They are immortalized as two bronze busts on the Zoo's front plaza.

Endangered Animals Of Africa


Endangered animals
Many parts of this planet were blessed with an abundant flora and fauna. With mechanization and the onset of industrialization, these born free animals and the natural vegetation stated to be depleted as a result of human activity and what was the end phenomenon, the extinction or near extinction of most of the animal and plant species. On the other hand, an endangered species is any species of animal or plant threatened with extinction as a result of the ongoing human activities to nature.

Pollution and the spillover effect destruction of habitats is the single and the greatest threat to many species around the world. Man has overexploited many of the animal and plant species and degraded most of the animal habitat and the ecology of many natural vegetation around the world. On the other hand,  the natural habitat degradation due to human activities is also part of the main cause for losses in biodiversity and may effects which results in many dangerous animal attacks.

Common Name            Location
Addax                                       North Africa
African Wild Ass                         Kenya, Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan
African Wild Dog                    East Africa, West Africa, Central & South africa
Asian elephant                           Sri Lanka, India, Philippines, Malaysia, Bali,
Aye-aye                                   Malagasy Republic (Madagascar)
Barbary Serval                           Algeria
Black Rhinoceros                        East Africa, West Africa, Central & South Africa
Cameroon Clawless Otter            Cameroon, Nigeria
Cheetah                                     Africa  and South Asian counties
Chimpanzee                               African countries
Clarke's Gazelle                          Ethiopia, Somalia and Sudan
Coquerel's Sifaka                        Madagascar
Cuvier's Gazelle                          Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia
Dama Gazelle                            Africa
Dorcas Gazelle                           Algeria,Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Morocco, Somalia                                                                                  
Dugong                                    East Africa Mauritious, Sri Lanka Southern Japan
Ethiopian Wolf                           Ethiopia
Fork-crowned Lemur                   Madagascar
Golden jackal                             Sri Lanka, Maldives, Bhutan, Bangladesh
Hairy-eared Dwarf Lemur             Madagascar
Leopard                                     Africa, Asia, Middle East
Malagasy Giant Jumping Rat         Madagascar
Mediterranean Monk Seal              Mediterranean Sea, NorthAfrican  Black Sea
Mountain Zebra                           Namibia, South Africa, Angola, Botswana
Pygmy Chimpanzee                     Congo Brazzavile Democratic Republic of Congo
Pygmy Mouse Lemur                     Madagascar
Red-eared Nose-spotted Monkey     Cameroon, Fernando Po, Nigeria
Rodrigues Fruit Bat                       Indian Ocean (Rodrigues Island)
Sand Cat                                     Africa, Asia, Europe, Middle East
Slender-horned Gazelle                  Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Sudan
Striped Hyena                              Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, Europe
Western Giant Eland                     Senegal, Nigeria, Benin, GhanaIvory Coast
Western Lowland Gorilla                Central and Western Africa countries
White-throated Guenon                 Western Nigeria
Zanzibar Suni                               Zanzibar and pemba islands
Dangerous animals protection
 As far as animal facts and figures are concerned, statewide survey on animals conducted found that 71% of all New York State rescue groups surprisingly had been turned away by many of the shelter groups and with reasons best known to them had gone forward and killed the very same animals they had offered to save.

 "There are tens of thousands of animals in New York State shelters waiting to be adopted and most are healthy, well-behaved and just in need of a loving home," Assembly Member Kellner said. "When a humane organization volunteers to take these animals, they should not be denied. A shelter should work with them to the fullest extent possible. States like California and Delaware have already passed similar legislation, and now it is time for New York to step up to the plate."



With the advent  of time and general with many animal attacks on the rise, animal rights awareness being on the forefront as animal safety and awareness is being achieved at a snail speed the modern society has pondered and questions arise if  there is  a future  for all animal rescue, adoption, education and protection?

Animal rescue, adoption, education and protection
 As far as the media is concerned of 19th May 20011, The Jeanne Marching Vet Traing was inaugurated. The Jeanne M Marching InternationalCenter for Animals Welfare Education was to be part of the University of Edinburgh's Royal (Dick)School of Veterinary study for veterinary Study.


Since its main aim of the project was to extend its collaborate with its international partners with the aim of  delivering a  wide range educational initiatives catering for different people and cultures in different parts of the world.



With the diverse of  different animal species from different animal  habitat, this initiative was geared to give all loving animal  people power to all the veterinary  students too work all over the world as the core objective was to create and strengthen education on animal welfare for its students and thereby creating awareness and bring about the forum which would  be geared to spear head all animal rescue, adoption, education and protection and any other animal related  issues for the days to come. Political debate on animal welfare and protection issues were to be part and parcel of the centers involvement.


Africa's big five protection a clash with African Safari
 On the African continent on Wednesday, May 18 2011, it was reported that Cattle and wildlife clash over tourism. Tourism as far as Kenya is concerned was among the second foreign exchange earner and for the county.



 With the frequent time to time clashes over animal habitat which had been encroached and people property were lost and dangerous animal attacks and encounters were reported, the sheer allure of huge incomes from tourism had created panic among livestock farmers and traders in TaitaTaveta County.


 The Kenyan Government schemes to set up disease free zones in the native habitat where the Masaai live along with the Kenya big five  to boost livestock farming especially for the lucrative export market had  hang in the balance as ranchers had no alternative but to set their sights instead on the value of conservancies.



The official said turning the ranches into conservancies which to the world at large in terms of preservation of animals for the future was to be part of the conservation of endangered species and rare species of animals while on the contrary this would prove to be a very big blow to the Government’s plans but if that is what the owners wanted there was very little that could be done.


The majestic African Wild Dog only found mainly inKenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Sudan, Somalia, Malawi South Africa and a few other countries in of the Sub-Saharan Africa. With very few African wild dogs remaining, these endangered animals are protected by law and can only be hunted with special permission. The Black Rhinoceros just as the African Rhino is considered an endangered species and on the brink of extinction in may parts ofKenya, Tanzania, South Africa, Namibia, and Angolawhere their number used to be plenty. This dangerous animal species has made come back thanks to the ongoing conservation in the sub Saharan Africa and many parts of the world.




With plenty of the African Cheetah research going on, the number of cheetah in East Africa where there is plenty of wild animals to attack and feed on, the African cheetah which is regarded as the fastest land animal in the world is part of the endangered species list. With little range to search for food and the demise of its territory and reported attacks, there are cases where animal water holes have been poisoned in order to stamp out or wipe out some of the dangerous animals to man.



Ethiopian Wolf only found in Ethiopia and the northern parts of Kenya is an exotic species of its own in the Ethiopian peninsula. With less than 300 in number, the Ethiopian wolf with very huge difference unlike the snow wolf and the ray wolf. This wolf species has undergone worse as far as its general feeding grounds are concerned. It has managed to withstand extreme weather conditions, diseases, and the general population as a whole.


 One of the most dangerous animals which is feared by other animals mainly for its ability to crack bones with a single bite is no other than the Hyena.  Lions, tigers, cheetahs and leopards always fear this animal when it searches for food. As far as its cousin  “The Striped Hyena” which inhabits; Asia in areas of Pakistan, Bhutan, Africa, and the Middle East; Algeria, Arabian Peninsula, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Morocco, Somalia, Syria, Tunisia and many parts of Europe is facing the same fate unless drastic actions are taken to conserve this stripped hyena before it becomes extinct.


The Myth behind animal attack in the modern world.
 Wild animals attacks on humans by endangered animals  such as lions, tigers, elephants, alligators, crocodiles, bears, snakes, mountain lions and all animals that are in the endangered species list have caused harm to people, property and the environment and above all have  become more common as people and animals start sharing the same animal and human habitat.

As many people continue to occupy the animal’s world, many animal attacks will continue to rise as both plants and animals’ environment will continue to be destroyed from the Arctic polar bears to the dangerous poisonous snakes of Africa and Asia. People who love animals know what it takes to raise animals. Many animal loving people know that animals have feelings and they need love and a family too.
When the CAARA was formed in the USA, it was geared to undertake comprehensive measures that would go beyond giving rescue groups the access to take care of animals. The knowledge about animals and animal health qualifications and guidelines were it sets for both animal shelters and rescue groups as a whole. Outlining the responsibilities of those who work directly with the animals will help ensure that the animals receive proper care. These provisions ensure that animals are given fresh food and water on a daily basis, exercise and socialization with other animals, clean living environments, and prompt veterinary care.
"Animal loving Americans would be shocked to know the reality of what's happening in our nation's shelters– including abuse, horrific conditions and unnecessary killings," says Debi Day, Director of No Kill Nation.



"Most shelters are mired in the status quo and unwilling to change, so CAARA is designed to mandate lifesaving policies at these facilities, and ensure safety, proper care and a chance at a good home for all shelter pets. We are thrilled that this legislation has been introduced in New York, as well as elsewhere across the US. CAARA is a crucial step on our road to a No Kill Nation."
Benefits of animal attacks, animal fights and mauling
 Many pictures of animals including dangerous animal attacks have been portrayed or caught on video depicting dangerous  animals mauling people, many animal attacks indifferent parts of the world and in the normal natural animal environment while to some extent innocent people and zoo keepers fine themselves attacked by zoo animals.



The African animals including the big five, the great sea animals such as the great white shark and not forgetting the Australian dangerous crocodiles, alligators and snakes have come to the limelight of being some of the most dangerous animals facts. The top dangerous animals have always lived to their expectations and the same animals have now become animals in danger.


Despite the fact that there is always awareness as to where to get animals information, the national geographic society has done extensive research on animals around the world. According to animal attack statistics, it’s amazing now to see recent stories all over the world to hear   animals abuse, pet attacks, and dog attacks and recently in India where it was caught live on video animals.


When animals attack on humans is aired on TV, this is the time when others are inspired to make animal games while to some extent funny animal videos which are humorous and very graphic animal pictures and animal photos come up In the end, you find all breath taking Oscar wining animal attack movies and armature home made animal attacks movies on you tube which can be easily accessed.

Adapting with nature from different animal attacks.
 For the scientist, there is always a new way of finding why different animal attack takes place in different environment whether it is a provoked attack or a nun provoked attack the beginning. Different animal species with their evolved natural habitat and surroundings always determine the provocation and the intent of the attack.

On the other hand, for the people who love dogs, snakes, lions, bears, monkeys just to mention a few you get that  many of them have kept them as pets while to some its just a mere necessity as a watchdog without prior knowledge of how to take care of dogs and other pets as well. What is the ramification, you find that expensive unwanted dog bite lawsuits and people seeking the services of dog bite attorneys are also on the rise.

Most government has come up with different animal attack laws and animal attack compensation so that both the owner and the person attacked by animals are protected by law. Should the dog be blamed for such an animal attack just because it’s a dangerous animal, should the dog or animal owner be punished because proper care and animal precaution and protection was not take care of? How about people who provoke the animal both knowingly or  unknowingly.


A good guess would be many of these animal attacks are so sudden such that there is always no time to foresee such animal encounters until they happen. Children who are bystanders or just inquisitive to play or the seemingly harmless dog just end up being the victim of animal attacks which could be very fatal

Endangered Species: Compensation for Wild Animal Attacks
The Pros and Cons
 In the recent news posted on the Hindu Times dated 15th May, the Indian Government announced the compensation to its people of all walk of life and mainly to the kin of people killed in attacks by wild animals as there have been devastating recent incidents which had prompted such a move for those people who are faced with permanent disability, deaths of domestic animals and crop loss as a result of the deadly and dangerous animal attacks which had come to be part of human rights and the need for the protection of the same dangerous animals roaming the jungles of Asia.

As far as the legality and the do and don’ts regarding the compensation and payments are concerned, the Order clearly state that the compensated amount of money will be handed over to the victims of the animal attacks if the person or people died, or those who got permanent disability or were injured during the event while they were in a restricted area or land which belonged to the government while the same goes to the loss of crops and farm animals too.
The persons killed during the animal attack incident  should not have indulged in unlawful activities in forest or restricted and protected natural habitat areas. Since curiosity killed the cat, you get that in this world which we are living in, survival for the fittest is always the order of the day. Man has evolved from being a hunter and a gatherer to sophisticate all rounded egoistic being looking for greener pastures in the rain forest, savannah, prairies and the pampas   where he is not intended to, there by exploiting and destroying our beautiful flora and fauna.


There are numerous cases where animals have become extinct and very rare animal species are becoming extinct due to poaching hunting, wild fires and as a result of global warming and the loss of wild animals breeding grounds. The ecological misbalance as a result of the food chain has districted the natural food cycle of many of the animal species. Rare species of animals are on the brink of being wiped out and the list of endangered species keep on rising.
Despite the fact that there is always a very big hue and cry from different animal rights groups and animal rescue and animal shelter groups you find that such animal attacks take place in these localities hence a certified medical doctor should ascertain and confirm during post-mortem that the death was caused by a wild animal attack. With difficult scarce resources to investigate the cause of death in many third world countries, many incidences are not reported due to fear of being  found to be the culprit or on the wrong by the concerned agencies whereas you get that for those who are in this business, this is the price they will always have to pay. Since man has not been able to understand the really secrets of nature and all its wild animals mythology, it’s the common person who ends up being devastated by wild animals.


If you find yourself being in the migratory rout of the Canadian Bison, Kenyan wildebeest and the Indian jumbo elephant makes you prone to animal attack. In many third world countries where majority of the communities are agrarian nomadic pastoralists all or almost all dwellings are not permanent houses, you find that most farmers’ dwellings offer little protection over animal attacks. Thus you find that many people find themselves vulnerable and if a mud or grass thatched house, animal, water shed, pump house, pipeline or fence is damaged in a wild elephant attack, the owner will be paid and for loss of cattle and other domestic animals too

Animal protection. A new chapter for endangered species.
 Since there has been a lot of  animal protection programs in may countries, animal parks, animal shelters and animal sanctuaries have been able to bring all endangered and rare species loser to man.


The big question come where by are people or have people been able to bring the same natural habitat into the zoos and animal sanctuaries which does not affect their living space as they would have been in the wild? These animals have now started to be on the animal watch list of endangered species and most of the endangered animals have been bred and released back in the nature. With the increased awareness of animal rights and protection policies in many social institutions in many countries, many beautiful land and sea  animals like crocodiles, foxes and monkeys in India weren’t that plenty.


As hunting and the demand for animal hides and skins and other different animal parts just to mention a few has led to the decline of such animal species to be wiped out. At the same time, flooding and changes in the environment have resulted in many animals finding themselves in new animal habitats. Are we to blame in such changes in our natural environment. Well animals have to adapt to it as we get to know these animals as time goes by.

Changing weather conditions rise with animal attack
Despite the boom in these animals, many localities and states continued to prevent and to label some of the animals as endangered species. Feeding of Foxes, Coyotes, bears and wild dogs say an increase in such animal population due to the easy availability of food which didn’t have any competition. With the changing climate conditions, most animals have been forces to look for water over long distances and that’s where nature collides with man.














Monday, 27 August 2012

Endangered African Chimps With Little Babbies



Chimpanzees are very familiar to us humans, perhaps because so much of their behavior reminds us of ourselves. They are considered great apes, just like gorillas, orangutans, and bonobos. Their distinctive mode of travel—walking on the soles of their feet and the knuckles of their hands—have earned them the title of knuckle-walkers.


Amazing apes
Chimps are very intelligent and can be trained by humans to perform a variety of tasks. For example, did you know that human beings were not the first to enter outer space? A chimp named Ham orbited Earth in 1961 and was taught simple commands to help test space travel for human astronauts. Ham became the first "American" in space! Because they are so smart, chimps have been involved in many scientific studies, and unfortunately some people keep them as pets. Taking them from the wild has caused a decline in their populations. People also hunt chimps for food (bushmeat) or to protect their crops from being eaten by hungry chimps. These conditions, plus loss of habitat, have resulted in the chimpanzee being an endangered animal.


Take a good look
There is no hair on a chimpanzee’s face, hands, or feet, but the rest of its body is covered with either long black or brown hair. Unlike other primates such as monkeys and baboons, chimps don’t have tails. But they do have large ears that stick out a bit, which helps them hear other chimps in a dense forest. Newborn chimps have pink skin under their dark hair that later turns black as they age. Like humans, chimps have opposable thumbs to help them grasp branches or grab a bite to eat, as well as fingernails and toenails.

The chimpanzee grand family

Home for a chimpanzee is a community of other chimps made up of family groups. Within these family groups there are usually about 6 to 10 individuals. An entire chimp community can sometimes have as many as 100 members, made up of many different family groups. One experienced adult male chimp can be the leader of the community, although in other communities leadership is shared among several males. Chimps use body language, facial expressions, hand-clapping, grooming, and kissing to communicate within their community. Usually a male chimp stays in the community into which he was born, but females transfer to other communities when they become adults.


Chimpanzee and rearing their young
Female chimps in the wild usually give birth for the first time when they are between 12 and 15 years old. The newborn is extremely helpless, and the youngster must stay with its mother until age seven before it can survive on its own. Soon after birth, the baby learns to cling to its mother’s underside. Later it will transfer to her back, and uses this "piggyback" style of riding for the next seven months or so. Young chimps get milk from their mothers until they are about three years old. They can begin walking on their own at about age four, but continue to stay with their mothers for a few more years, learning all the skills they need to survive. A mother chimp develops a close bond with her young that may last a lifetime.

Everything tastes good!
Chimpanzees eat a wide variety of food. Observers have recorded about 80 different items wild chimps eat, including seeds, fruit, leaves, bark, honey, flowers, and insects. This makes up most of their diet. However, chimpanzees also hunt other animals, like monkeys or small antelope, for meat. Feeding is usually an individual activity, but sometimes chimps look for food together. Chimpanzees are famous for using tools to get food. They often strip a branch of leaves and then dip it in an ant or termite hill to get the insects inside. When water is scarce, chimps chew leaves so they are soft and sponge-like—this allows them to then soak up rainwater inside of tree holes.


Chimpanzees are very familiar to us humans, perhaps because so much of their behavior reminds us of ourselves. They are considered great apes, just like gorillas, orangutans, and bonobos. Their distinctive mode of travel—walking on the soles of their feet and the knuckles of their hands—have earned them the title of knuckle-walkers.


African beautiful Amazing apes
Chimps are very intelligent and can be trained by humans to perform a variety of tasks. For example, did you know that human beings were not the first to enter outer space? A chimp named Ham orbited Earth in 1961 and was taught simple commands to help test space travel for human astronauts. Ham became the first "American" in space! Because they are so smart, chimps have been involved in many scientific studies, and unfortunately some people keep them as pets. Taking them from the wild has caused a decline in their populations. People also hunt chimps for food (bushmeat) or to protect their crops from being eaten by hungry chimps. These conditions, plus loss of habitat, have resulted in the chimpanzee being an endangered animal.


Chimpanzee great features
There is no hair on a chimpanzee’s face, hands, or feet, but the rest of its body is covered with either long black or brown hair. Unlike other primates such as monkeys and baboons, chimps don’t have tails. But they do have large ears that stick out a bit, which helps them hear other chimps in a dense forest. Newborn chimps have pink skin under their dark hair that later turns black as they age. Like humans, chimps have opposable thumbs to help them grasp branches or grab a bite to eat, as well as fingernails and toenails.



The chimpanzee dangerous and beautiful community
Home for a chimpanzee is a community of other chimps made up of family groups. Within these family groups there are usually about 6 to 10 individuals. An entire chimp community can sometimes have as many as 100 members, made up of many different family groups. One experienced adult male chimp can be the leader of the community, although in other communities leadership is shared among several males. Chimps use body language, facial expressions, hand-clapping, grooming, and kissing to communicate within their community. Usually a male chimp stays in the community into which he was born, but females transfer to other communities when they become adults.


Female chimps in the wild usually give birth for the first time when they are between 12 and 15 years old. The newborn is extremely helpless, and the youngster must stay with its mother until age seven before it can survive on its own. Soon after birth, the baby learns to cling to its mother’s underside. Later it will transfer to her back, and uses this "piggyback" style of riding for the next seven months or so. Young chimps get milk from their mothers until they are about three years old. They can begin walking on their own at about age four, but continue to stay with their mothers for a few more years, learning all the skills they need to survive. A mother chimp develops a close bond with her young that may last a lifetime.


Chimpanzees eat a wide variety of food. Observers have recorded about 80 different items wild chimps eat, including seeds, fruit, leaves, bark, honey, flowers, and insects. This makes up most of their diet. However, chimpanzees also hunt other animals, like monkeys or small antelope, for meat. Feeding is usually an individual activity, but sometimes chimps look for food together. Chimpanzees are famous for using tools to get food. They often strip a branch of leaves and then dip it in an ant or termite hill to get the insects inside. When water is scarce, chimps chew leaves so they are soft and sponge-like—this allows them to then soak up rainwater inside of tree holes.